Since 2011 I have been revisiting the American Civil War to encourage a revitalized interest through the utilization of multi-platform single-storytelling.

By producing content that develops across multiple forms of media, we are able to explore both history and the future of how we will collectively share, gather and publish memories and historical lessons across these multiple platforms.

Read more about the American Civil War and explore how today’s technology impacts the storytelling process at THE 150 PROJECT

 

Stones River National Battlefield: Murfreesboro, Tennessee December 31, 2012.

VIDEO ABOVE: United States Marine Josh Wagner, Iraq War veteran and American Civil War reenactor personalizes the individual soldier’s empathy for those who fought previous wars and brings history into present reality.

PHOTOS BELOW: The following are examples of work shot for The New Yorker Instagram feed while on assignment to cover the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

GETTYSBURG FOR THE NEW YORKER INSTAGRAM

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Two members of a drum and fife corps stand ready to play during one of the week’s many living history demonstrations at Gettysburg National Military Park.

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A Confederate living historian and hundreds of tourists stand ready to retrace the steps of the men who made the ill-fated charge at Gettysburg. The 12500 man 3/4 mile charge, across uneven and open terrain, led by Confederate Major Gen Pickett resulted in a staggering casualty rate of 50% July 3 1863.

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21st century modes of transport interlopes into the 19th via roaming Segways at Gettysburg National Military Park.

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With a shoulder draped rebel flag and a toy gun in her hand, a young girl carefully makes the way down the time and traffic smoothed rocks of Devil’s Den while playing war with her brother at Gettysburg National Military Park July 2, 2013.

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“Awful, awful rocks!!” For weeks, after the battle at Devils Den, a delirious Alabama soldier suffering from his wounds would repeat. 150 years ago these rocks were the scene of bloody carnage but today a quiet place to reflect and watch visitors play and scramble across the boulders.

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Visitors to Gettysburg National Military Park take part in a artillary demonstration.

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Confederate living historians take a break from the midafternoon heat at Gettysburg National Military Park.

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Confederate living historians watch infantry firing demonstrations from the shade and cover of Pitzer Woods at Gettysburg July 2. It’s in these woods, the afternoon of July 2, 1863, where Confederate Gen. Longstreet would anchor the left of his line in attempt to dislodge a fortified Federal force at Cemetery Ridge.

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LEFT: “The muffled drum’s sad roll has beat the soldier’s last tattoo, no more on life’s parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.”

RIGHT: Visitors to Gettysburg National Battlefield Park are dwarfed by a statue near the Soldier’s National Cemetery.

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Small articles of humanity such as a pack of playing cards, a journal or photos from home would have been the few personal items a Civil War era soldier would have carried throughout the war.

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Visitors to Gettysburg National Military Park are small against the sky and next to large boulders that form the Devils Den, the scene of a brutal wave of rebel infantry assaults made-up of Texans, Arkansans, and Alabamians July 2, 1863.

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A Confederate living historian cooks his supper of boiled potatoes and beans at Gettysburg National Military Park.

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Living historians hang clothing out to dry while bivouacking at Gettysburg National Military Park.

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LEFT: Michael Jantzen, 25, from Freeport, MI was interested in history at an early age and began participating in living history demonstrations by age 13.

RIGHT: A female reenactor poses on the field where Confederate forces will mass July 3, 1863 before making their ill-fated charge on the consolidated Union front. The 12500 man 3/4 mile charge, led by Major Gen. George Pickett, will result in a 50% causality rate and failed objective.

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Looking west toward South Mountain, the rebels will advance across this field at the end of the first day of battle at Gettysburg July 1, 1863. The advance forces a crumbling Union line’s retreat back into Gettysburg. The next day, July 2, 1863, Gen. Lee will continue his offensive.

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Simon Sobolewski, 51, a living historian from Victoria, British Columbia.

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“The neighing troop, the flashing blade, the bugle’s stirring blast, the charge, the dreadful cannonade, the din and shout are past.” — The Bivouac of the Dead by Theodore O’Hara.

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“On fame’s eternal camping-ground, their silent tents are spread, and glory guards with solemn round the bivouac of the dead.” The Bivouac of the Dead by Theodore O’Hara, poet, Mexican-American War veteran, Confederate colonel.

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Tourists tour The State of Pennsylvania Monument.

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